A menu for the third millenium

Home Technologist 01 Foods for the future A menu for the third millenium

One reason to grow meat in a lab is to reduce the environmental impact of meat consumption. But to get consumers interested, producers will need to appeal to their eyes and stomachs, not just their consciences. In short, in vitro meat will have to be part of an entire new cuisine.

This is the idea behind the In Vitro Meat Cookbook, released in May 2014 by Next Nature Network of the Eindhoven University of Technology’s Department of Industrial Design. Here are three examples of futuristic approaches.

A meaty oyster

The nutritional matter surrounding rows of miniature bireactors ebbs and flows with the tide. This causes the artificial muscles to contract, giving these in vitro oysters the meaty texture of real ones.

The nutritional matter surrounding rows of miniature bireactors ebbs and flows with the tide. This causes the artificial muscles to contract, giving these in vitro oysters the meaty texture of real ones.

 

See-through sashimi

Grown without blood vessels and nerves, in-vitro flesh could be transparent, creating beef and tuna that are practically invisible.

Grown without blood vessels and nerves, in-vitro flesh could be transparent, creating beef and tuna that are practically invisible.

 

Animal pearls

Pearls filled with lab-grown animal fat could be served in salads or spread on toast, replacing the lard used in Mexican tamales and traditional Jewish matzo balls.

Pearls filled with lab-grown animal fat could be served in salads or spread on toast, replacing the lard used in Mexican tamales and traditional Jewish matzo balls.

Technologist 01.034

More on futuristic foods:
From stem cells to Big Macs
It’s food, but not as you know it
Bacteria, on your plate

SIMILAR ARTICLES

Food delivery start-ups

Food delivery start-ups are popping up all over. A fierce battle is on in a winner-takes-all industry.
wine-tasting

Producing wine non-stop!
plantation Africa

An app to spot crop diseases.